THE LAKES REGION FLYING CLUB HISTORY

The first Directors’ meeting of The Lakes Region Flying Club was called on June 28, 1956 and the Club was officially founded July 5, 1956. Present at the first meeting were the original 7 Charter Members. The original 7 were: Alma Galleger (former owner of the Laconia Citizen), Horace Ballard, Les Hibbert, Cal Batchelder, Dave Weeks, Clarence Barnard, and Harry Howland. The first Club President was Les Hibbert. At the completion of the first year there were 27 members. Over the years, several hundred pilots have belonged to the organization.

The Club has owned 12 different airplanes including both high and low wing. The Club’s first plane was a 1947 Piper PA-12, a 3-place cruiser donated by Don Vaughn—the longtime operator of Laconia Airport and the originator of Winnipesaukee Aviation. Currently the Club owns a 1981 Archer II which was purchased in 1984 with 496 hours. The plane now has 4,900 hours on the airframe and 1,100 hours on its third engine.

In October of 1983 the Club charter was amended with the New Hampshire Secretary of State to be a Voluntary Corporation with stock. 100 shares were originally distributed to the then existing members in a ratio of months that each had belonged to the club as compared to the total number of months membership of the entire group. Since that time, additional stock has been sold to raise all members to a minimum of 8 shares (new members are now required to puchase 15 shares). No market exists for the sale of shares except to new or existing members through the Treasurer using a process described in the by-laws.

The Club has a full slate of Officers and prides itself on being very financially conservative and well-funded. Reserves are set aside for engine and avionics replacements as part of the hourly flying charges.

The purpose of the Club has always been to provide a well outfitted, meticulously maintained airplane at economical rates. The Club plane is always hangared out of the elements and is preheated daily in the colder weather.